Google’s new Gemini app landed a few days ago, promising a supercharged, AI-driven answer to… well, everything. However, the day it launched, it seemed I wasn’t the only one finding Gemini more frustrating than fantastic.

The most jarring annoyance was the need to manually hit the ‘Send’ button after every single voice command. It sounds like a minor thing, but this clunky extra step shattered the illusion of a smooth, “assistant-like” experience. I wasn’t sure how quickly Google would tackle these teething problems, making me seriously consider uninstalling the Gemini app.

That’s why I was pleasantly surprised to find that Gemini now works as it should – commands are understood and executed automatically, without the manual button press. Clearly, Google was paying attention to initial feedback and acted quickly with a server-side fix. I noticed this change on Saturday (February 10) and so did the folks over at 9to5Google.

Google-gemini-pop-up

More than a ChatGPT copycat

Gemini promises to evolve into a proper Google Assistant replacement, not just a trendy ChatGPT competitor. Right now, the focus does seem tilted towards conversational AI responses, which have been impressive during my testing. Gemini easily tackles trivia questions, summarizes complex topics, and even writes decent haikus on demand.

Importantly, Google has openly acknowledged Gemini’s early shortcomings. They’re actively working on adding core Google Assistant features – tasks like managing your calendar, creating reminders, and integrating with smart home routines.

Apart from this, it seems Google also flipped a switch in the background, enabling more users outside the US to be able to use the Gemini app after sideloading the APK. PiunikaWeb’s Hillary was able to access Gemini in Kenya, a region where it was locked during launch. So with fast patches and the promise of key feature restorations, I no longer feel like Gemini is a lost cause.

Signs of potential

Google Assistant users know the value of tight integration with the broader Google ecosystem. If Gemini can seamlessly tap into Search, Gmail, Maps, and the rest, it truly has the potential to revolutionize how we use our phones. Right now, it’s more of a fascinating concept than a finished product. Yet, the swift resolution of the ‘send button’ fiasco gives me hope.

While a bit rough around the edges, Gemini is shaping up to be something genuinely exciting. As features trickle back in and Google’s AI polish continues, I anticipate Gemini evolving into the versatile, integrated assistant we’ve been waiting for. For now, I’m keeping it installed and an eye on its progress. In case you aren’t on the same page as me, you can check out our article on how to switch back to Google Assistant.

Dwayne Cubbins
940 Posts

My fascination with Android phones began the moment I got my hands on one. Since then, I've been on a journey to decode the ever-evolving tech landscape, fueled by a passion for both the "how" and the "why." Since 2018, I've been crafting content that empowers users and demystifies the tech world. From in-depth how-to guides that unlock your phone's potential to breaking news based on original research, I strive to make tech accessible and engaging.

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